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Dexedrine - Focalin Warnings and Precautions

This page contains links to eMedTV ADHD Articles containing information on subjects from Dexedrine to Focalin Warnings and Precautions. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Dexedrine
    Dexedrine is a prescription medication used to treat ADHD and narcolepsy. This eMedTV article provides an overview of Dexedrine, including information about some of its side effects and tips concerning how and when to take the medication.
  • Dexedrine 10 mg Spansules
    Dexedrine comes in a number of strengths, such as 10 mg Dexedrine Spansules. This eMedTV article offers Dexedrine dosing guidelines for the treatment of ADHD in various age groups and includes tips for using this drug.
  • Dexedrine 15 mg Spansules
    As this eMedTV page explains, 15 mg Dexedrine Spansules are the highest strength available for this drug. This article explains how Dexedrine Spansules work and offers dosing guidelines for the treatment of ADHD and narcolepsy for various age groups.
  • Dexedrine 5 mg Spanules
    As this eMedTV page explains, children ages 6 to 12 being treated for ADHD usually start with 5 mg of Dexedrine (Spansules or tablets) daily. This article offers dosing recommendations for children over 12 and explains how dosing works for narcolepsy.
  • Dexedrine Abuse
    Abusing Dexedrine can have serious health consequences, such as cardiovascular failure. This eMedTV segment discusses the dangers of Dexedrine abuse and explains how an addiction to the drug is usually treated with behavioral therapy.
  • Dexedrine and Alcohol
    Combining Dexedrine and alcohol may affect your ability to drive a car. This page on the eMedTV site discusses why combining these two products can be dangerous and explains why people with a history of alcohol abuse should probably avoid the medication.
  • Dexedrine and Pregnancy
    Dexedrine may not be safe for women who are pregnant. This eMedTV resource discusses Dexedrine and pregnancy, including information concerning animal studies in which the drug appeared to cause miscarriages and birth defects.
  • Dexedrine and Weight Loss
    Weight loss is a potential side effect of Dexedrine. This eMedTV resource explores Dexedrine and weight loss, explaining that the drug can be prescribed to help with weight loss, even though the FDA has not approved it for this use.
  • Dexedrine Dosage
    For people 12 years and older with narcolepsy, the starting Dexedrine dosage is usually 10 mg a day. This eMedTV segment discusses Dexedrine dosing in general and provides guidelines for when and how to best take the medication.
  • Dexedrine Drug Information
    Are you looking for information about Dexedrine? This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at this drug, with information on specific conditions it can treat, how often it can be taken, and more. A link to more details is also included.
  • Dexedrine Drug Interactions
    Examples of medications that may interact with Dexedrine include Demerol, Thorazine, and Lithobid. This eMedTV Web page highlights a variety of Dexedrine drug interactions, such as those that may occur with blood pressure medications.
  • Dexedrine Oral
    Dexedrine is a prescription drug used to treat ADHD and narcolepsy. This eMedTV page offers general dosing guidelines for oral Dexedrine tablets and Spansules, explores the effects of this drug, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Dexedrine Overdose
    The effects of a Dexedrine overdose may include such things as fast breathing, fever, and hyperactivity. This eMedTV article describes other possible effects of an overdose involving Dexedrine and looks at treatment options for such an overdose.
  • Dexedrine Sexual Side Effects
    There are potential sexual side effects of Dexedrine, including a decreased libido and impotence. This eMedTV page looks at Dexedrine sexual side effects and discusses some treatment options for them, such as erectile dysfunction medicines.
  • Dexedrine Side Effects
    Some of the most common Dexedrine side effects can include loss of appetite, dizziness, and insomnia. This eMedTV Web page also takes an in-depth look at some of its more serious side effects, such as hallucinations or chest pain.
  • Dexedrine Spansules
    Available in the form of tablets and Spansules, Dexedrine is a drug used to treat ADHD. This eMedTV resource explains how often Dexedrine is taken, lists its possible side effects, and offers general warnings and precautions for this medicine.
  • Dexedrine Uses
    Some uses of Dexedrine include the treatment of narcolepsy and the treatment of ADHD in children and teens. This eMedTV segment explores these Dexedrine uses in more detail and discusses "off-label" uses of the medication.
  • Dexedrine Warnings and Precautions
    Some precautions and warnings to be aware of with Dexedrine concern its addictive nature. This eMedTV segment calls attention to other Dexedrine warnings and precautions to be familiar with before taking the drug.
  • Dexedrine Without a Prescription
    It is illegal under federal and some state laws to obtain or use Dexedrine without a prescription. This eMedTV article also explains why it is dangerous to use Dexedrine without the supervision of your healthcare provider.
  • Dexedrine: A Controlled Substance
    Dexedrine, a controlled substance, is covered by special rules that specify how it may be prescribed. This eMedTV resource explains why Dexedrine is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance and covers some of the rules that pertain to it.
  • Dexidrine
    Dexedrine can be used to treat narcolepsy or ADHD. This eMedTV article explains that Dexedrine can cause a calming or a stimulating effect and also lists symptoms that may occur if you overdose on it. Dexidrine is a common misspelling of Dexedrine.
  • Diagnosing ADHD
    As this eMedTV segment explains, ADHD can be hard to diagnose. Many people exhibit the main ADHD symptoms of hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity. This article offers more information on making a diagnosis and links to other articles about ADHD.
  • Diagnosing ADHD in Adults
    As this article on the eMedTV Web site explains, a key aspect of diagnosing adults with ADHD is the presence of current symptoms that began in childhood. A physical exam and psychological tests are also part of the process.
  • Distractibility
    Adults with ADHD are easily distracted, even by things that aren't normally a distraction for people without ADHD. For instance, adults may find their own wandering thoughts to be a huge distraction at work or while having conversations with others.
  • Do Children Inherit ADHD From Their Parents?
    Is ADHD inherited? As this eMedTV Web page explains, studies show this is definitely the case; however, this isn't the whole picture. Environmental factors likely play a role as well.
  • Do I Meet the ADHD Diagnostic Criteria?
    According to the official diagnostic guidelines used by most doctors for inattentive type ADHD, an adult must have 5 out of the 9 symptoms described in this slideshow (children would need to meet 6 of the same criteria). In addition, these symptoms must have first shown up before age 12; must be present in at least 2 different settings (such as at work and at home); must have been present for at least 6 months; and must negatively interfere with social, work, or academic functioning.
  • Do I Meet the ADHD Diagnostic Criteria?
    According to the official diagnostic guidelines used by most doctors for hyperactive-impulsive type ADHD, an adult must have 5 out of the 9 symptoms described in this slideshow (children would need to meet 6 of the same criteria). In addition, these symptoms must have first shown up before age 12; must be present in at least 2 different settings (such as at work and at home); must have been present for at least 6 months; and must negatively interfere with social, work, or academic functioning.
  • Do I Need to See a Specialist for Adult ADHD?
    Wondering if you should see a specialist for adult ADHD? As this eMedTV resource explains, your regular doctor can likely diagnose and treat the condition, although there are certain cases where a specialist is needed, which this page lists.
  • Do People Take ADHD Medication for Life?
    Can you expect to take ADHD medications your entire life? As this eMedTV resource explains, your symptoms might lessen, which could reduce your need for medicine. In addition, as people age, long-term treatment might not be safe.
  • Do Video Games Cause ADHD?
    This eMedTV selection explains that although video games do not cause ADHD, they can certainly exacerbate symptoms, as can television. This Web page discusses this issue in detail, explaining why people believe there is a link between the two.
  • Does Adult ADHD Cause Sex Addiction?
    Is there a link between sex addiction and adult ADHD? This eMedTV segment takes a look at this topic and explains why contributing factors might actually be to blame.
  • Does Adult ADHD Have to Be Treated?
    So what happens if you don't treat adult ADHD? As this eMedTV resource explains, the consequences of not treating it can be disastrous. However, this is a personal choice, and you should discuss it carefully with your doctor.
  • Does Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Work for Adult ADHD?
    Should you add cognitive behavioral therapy to your adult ADHD treatment plan? This segment of the eMedTV site urges readers to seriously consider it, as it can ensure a more successful treatment over just medication alone.
  • Does Marijuana Help With Adult ADHD?
    Does marijuana help with adult ADHD symptoms? This eMedTV page explains that anecdotal evidence suggests it might be useful; however, there are definite risks with this approach and no good studies supporting it.
  • Does My Child Have ADHD?
    It is normal for children to occasionally daydream during school, forget their homework, or become fidgety while sitting at the dinner table. However, lack of attention (inattentiveness), hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior (impulsivity) are also signs of ADHD. These are the three main groups of symptoms. Some children with ADHD primarily have the inattentive type. Others may have a combination of types. Those with the inattentive type are less disruptive and are more likely to not be diagnosed with ADHD. The first step in dealing with this disorder is to recognize the signs and symptoms.
  • Don't Forget the Fat
    Forget all that nonsense you may have heard that fat is bad for you. Too much fat is bad for you. But, like carbs, your body needs some fat to function properly. Fat helps regulate your appetite, increases brain function, and stabilizes mood. The key is to pick healthy fats. Good choices include avocados, olive oil, salmon, and nuts.
  • Ecstasy
    Also known as MDMA, ecstasy is a popular illicit drug that acts as both a stimulant and a hallucinogen. The drug produces strong feelings of warmth, empathy, and pleasure, which makes it popular among teens at clubs and raves. When these pleasurable effects wear off, users may feel confused, depressed, anxious, and have difficulty sleeping -- even days and weeks later. Like other stimulants, the drug can cause dangerous increases in heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature. Mixing ecstasy with prescription ADHD stimulants may be particularly dangerous.
  • Effects of Ritalin
    Although it is a stimulant, Ritalin is commonly used to improve behavior in children with ADHD. This eMedTV article briefly describes the effects of Ritalin, with information on potential side effects, safety issues to be aware of, and more.
  • Effects of Strattera
    This eMedTV page explains that in clinical studies, Strattera was an effective ADHD medicine, with people experiencing a significant reduction in symptoms when compared to those not taking it. This page also includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Fidgeting and Squirming
    Are your hands and feet always "busy"? Do you like to always have something in your hands (such as a paper clip) to "play" with? Constant fidgeting with your hands and feet, as well as squirming in your seat, are signs of adult ADHD.
  • Focalen
    This eMedTV segment gives an overview of Focalin, a prescription drug used for the treatment of ADHD. This page discusses Focalin effects and potential side effects, as well as what to do if you overdose. Focalen is a common misspelling of Focalin.
  • Focalin
    Focalin is a prescription drug licensed to treat ADHD. This eMedTV article explains that Focalin causes a calming effect even though it is a stimulant, and also highlights dosing guidelines and potential side effects with the drug (such as nausea).
  • Focalin 10 mg Tablets
    There are three different strengths available for Focalin tablets; 10 mg is the highest available strength. This eMedTV segment offers general Focalin dosing guidelines and explains what the maximum recommended dosage is for this medication.
  • Focalin 5 mg Tablets
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, 5 mg Focalin tablets are among the three different strengths available for this ADHD medication. This article explains what other strengths are available and also offers general dosing guidelines for the drug.
  • Focalin and Alcohol
    This eMedTV page explains why you may want to avoid mixing Focalin and alcohol. Specifically, taking Focalin and alcohol together may affect your ability to perform certain tasks; and people who have abused alcohol may be more likely to abuse Focalin.
  • Focalin and Depression
    This eMedTV page explains that it is difficult to tell how commonly people taking Focalin experience depression. This page explores Focalin and depression in more detail, noting in particular that the drug can be used off-label to treat depression.
  • Focalin and Hair Loss
    This eMedTV article explores Focalin and hair loss, explaining that although hair loss appears to be a side effect in people taking a medication similar to Focalin, hair loss was not reported as a common side effect of Focalin in short-term studies.
  • Focalin and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to take Focalin during pregnancy. This eMedTV article explains that Focalin did cause problems to fetuses in pregnant animal studies. If you're taking Focalin and pregnancy occurs, you should let your healthcare provider know.
  • Focalin and Weight Loss
    This eMedTV Web page explores Focalin and weight loss, explaining that using Focalin for weight loss is one off-label use of the medication. However, stimulants such as Focalin are often abused for this purpose.
  • Focalin Dosing
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the recommended starting Focalin dose for people who have not taken methylphenidate before is Focalin 2.5 mg twice daily. This page also lists some of the factors that can affect your Focalin dosage (like your age).
  • Focalin Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, among the drugs that Focalin can potentially interact with are pressors, seizure medications, and warfarin. Focalin drug interactions can possibly raise your risk of bleeding or side effects, among other things.
  • Focalin for Adults
    This eMedTV article explains that while the FDA has not approved the use of Focalin for adults with ADHD, a healthcare provider may prescribe the medication to an adult if he or she believes that it is appropriate for that person's situation.
  • Focalin Medication
    In clinical trials, the ADHD medication Focalin was shown to improve symptoms in children and teenagers. This eMedTV article briefly describes how Focalin is taken and lists some of the possible side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • Focalin Medication Information
    Focalin is a medication that is available by prescription to help improve symptoms of ADHD. This eMedTV article offers more information on the medication, including some of Focalin's dosing guidelines and important warnings for the drug.
  • Focalin Oral
    Available in the form of oral tablets, Focalin is a drug used for treating ADHD. This eMedTV Web page explains how Focalin works, describes its effects, and lists some of the side effects that have been reported with this medication.
  • Focalin Overdose
    A recent Focalin overdose can be treated by pumping the stomach or giving certain drugs. This eMedTV page covers the effects of a Focalin overdose (such as confusion) and explains that you should seek immediate medical attention if you've overdosed.
  • Focalin Side Affects
    Among the potential side effects of Focalin are nausea and a loss of appetite. This eMedTV page also lists some Focalin side effects to report to your doctor (such as confusion). Focalin side affects is a common misspelling of Focalin side effects.
  • Focalin Side Effects
    A few common Focalin side effects include nausea, a loss of appetite, and a fever. This eMedTV Web page also discusses rare side effects of Focalin (such as drowsiness and headache) and side effects to report to your doctor (like fainting or seizures).
  • Focalin Uses
    As this eMedTV article explains, Focalin is used mainly to treat ADHD in children and adolescents -- but it may also be used off-label to treat adult ADHD. This page lists other off-label Focalin uses and explains the drug's effects and how it works.
  • Focalin Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV Web page discusses a number of Focalin warnings and precautions, including possible drug interactions and the risk of vision problems or sudden death in some people taking the drug. This article also covers who should avoid Focalin.
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